Physical exercise


I just wanted to remind you guys how important physical exercise is to our bodies.

I was feeing worse recently, but since I am getting fatter and fatter, I finally decided to move a bit. I bought a stationary bike and I cycle each evening. It’s not much, but only after a couple of days I feel better. I have more energy and am more enthusiastic. The endorphins are working, believe me.

So start moving, if you can. Don’t overdo, you need to see small progress and satisfaction, not exhaustion and fractures.


Such a good reminder for me personally, even though I’m usually reticent to admit it when I’m already too far down a spiral. I’d like to get better at maintaining a more continuous level of commitment to movement that I find joyful.

Good to hear that you’re finding benefits in those endorphins!


You’re right but for me it’s been so hard to get moving lately. I used to be fit but work has been hard on me in the last 3 years and I put the weight back on.

It’s counter-intuitive to workout to build up more energy when you’re exhausted.


I understand, I have been there as well. My tip is: start excercising when you’re at the top of your game (daily wise).


I’ve long ignored this for so many years. I worked through lunch breaks and I never gave myself time to remain healthy. It took too long for me to take it seriously.

Changing jobs, focusing on healthy eating, losing 30+lbs, and I still have to be mindful to force myself to make the time nearly daily to exercise. It’s harder in the winter, but after getting an Apple Watch, I’ve used my OCD to keep my circles and records going. That is what it took to get me to go to the gym.

I feel guilty to my family and my co-workers for even thinking about going for a walk because it takes away time they have with me or takes me away from my obligations. However, I know I’m better if I go on a walk every day. Even for 15 minutes. A good 45-60 minute walk every day really helps wind me down.


Personally, I like to think of my body as a machine: have to keep the machine well fueled (eat good food) and well-maintained (get exercise and rest). Luckily, your body can do a lot of the maintenance by itself, you just need to give it the right raw materials, and the correct triggers.

For exercise at least, I’ve found it easiest if I stick to a schedule: work out at the same place and same time everyday. If I give myself an option for when to work out, I will often talk myself out of it.


It’s can be hard. I know when I get a bit sideways I revert to grabbing a vanilla slice of cake on the way home, have a coke, sit at the computer until I go to bed. Breakfast can be a couple of donuts and a coke with lunch being a trip to Subway. And If my boss got to me during the day, which was, maybe still will be, pretty common, I won’t sleep while I churn the day.

I’ve realized that I have to force myself to go climb a hill when that happens. It takes about an hour but the up is strenuous enough that it usually knocks the worst of it out. I also have a fitbit that reminds me to move every hour. I work in a 8x10 room with no windows so I can literally go all day and not talk to anyone. I barely see people in my own department. It forces me up and to move even if all I do is walk back and forth in the hallway for a couple of minutes.

I also have a rowing machine and 30 minutes on that helps a ton too.

The fitbit also has a guided breathing program, something I try to do every so often for the 2 minute cycle at least.

During lunch, I may still eat poorly, but I make sure that I go for a walk or get in my car and go somewhere. Even if I just sit in the car at least I’m out of the office and I’ll typically nap or meditate a bit.

I won’t even comment on the weight. I’ve been crazy fit my whole life except for occasional stints and I saw a picture of myself, and oops, not any more. The good news is that I actually looked younger than I am but damn I was fat.